Monday, February 28, 2011

No Sunbathing in the Nude

Thanks for joining in the fun here at Chiseled in Rock!

When I posted "Log Legs" two weeks ago, I provided a hint about this week's photo, which is perhaps a bit more complex. So without further ado, and for your writing pleasure...

It is often said that a picture is worth a thousand words, so we'll provide the picture in hopes that you'll provide the words!



What came to mind when you saw this picture?

Write a caption, log line, or flash fiction! Write the first paragraph of a short story or novel! Please share as a comment.

Janet Fogg
The non-fiction caption for No Sunbathing in the Nude:
1969 photo by Richard Fogg. Roof parapet, officer’s quarters, Saigon, Vietnam.

Follow us!

8 comments:

N. R. Williams said...

The 60's protester's over Vietnam brought out the best and worst in many young people. Margaret, wondered what the beach looked like to the unnamed person who wrote, "War is Hell." She glanced behind her, considered her small children, still in the van, and decided to leave her own thoughts behind. "No sunbathing in the nude!"
Nancy
N. R. Williams, The Treasures of Carmelidrium

Tamela Buhrke said...

"Private!" The Sarge yelled. "We've spotted a large group of nude sunbathers over that ridge. Get this message to platoon B. We're going in."
I saluted, then turned to leave.
"Oh, and private?" He said, turning back to his map. "Wipe that silly grin off your face."

Janet Fogg said...

These are great!! Thanks for making ME grin!

Ron at CM said...

That confounded idjit painter cain't get anythin' right.

I told him WARTS is hell. Specially in a place where the sun don't get much anyhow. It's supposed to be a friggin' warning!

Janet Fogg said...

Ron! LOL!

Thanks for sharing!

Chiseled in Rock said...

Ron, Hilarious!

Dave

Rabid Fox said...

One may see a sausage fest. Another may see a missile strike.

James Kelly said...

The end of the war started with a stencil: "No sunbathing in the nude." Little did the officer who issued the order suspect the upheaval his prudishness would unleash, beginning with anonymous graffiti and leading to a general's disgrace when he lost his privates.