Monday, February 11, 2013

The Book Release Blues

Is post-liber libero depression (also known as PLLD, or the Book Release Blues) afflicting you? Don’t worry, books are released every day and you don’t have to suffer alone!

Symptoms of PLLD vary, but may include:
-Social media overload
-Desire to check your Amazon ranking many times a day
-Lack of desire to continue working on your new manuscript
-Inability to be witty when signing a book (especially for friends)
-Vague embarrassment when people rave about your book
-Vague embarrassment when you explain to a stranger that you’re a writer
-Vague embarrassment when you re-read your new book – and really enjoy it

Writing a book and getting it published requires an extraordinary amount of effort, focus, and care. Research suggests that PLLD could be a functional component of an author’s post-book release decision making process, supporting the notion that PLLD is a normal phenomenon experienced by authors in varying degrees, and most typically alternating with a sense of euphoria and delight. (See “Whiplash Effect.”)

There are many methods of coping, including strategies such as long trips to the Arctic or learning to read hieroglyphics, but it might be helpful to understand that these may not resolve the problem and could negatively impact the author’s long-term work strategy. So it’s best to avoid avoidance. Seek support from writer friends. Re-read every positive book review. Celebrate. Give yourself permission to be proud. Then get back to work.

by Janet Fogg
Janet is the author of Soliloquy, an award-winning historical romance, and co-author of the military history best seller, Fogg in the Cockpit.


3 comments:

Julie Luek said...

What a delightful predicament to be in. As Willy Wonka said, "The suspense is killing me. I hope it lasts forever."

Patricia Stoltey said...

I've certainly been there, but I'm pretty sure I'm fully recovered...darn it.

Davee said...

It seems book release day is almost anti-climactic. I always look forward to it, but, then, it feels fleeting----and the real work of marketing begins.